Posts Tagged ‘Self Published’

A Bookish Affair reviews The Moon Coin

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Little Library Muse Reviews The Moon Coin

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2012 Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards: Gold Medal Winner

Six chapters formatted for ePubMobi, or PDF.

Please share these files with your friends. Enjoy.

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Paperback and eBook now available:

Amazon and Second Looks Books.

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Copyright © 2011 by Richard Due. All rights reserved. Gibbering Gnome Press,

A Division of Ingenious Inventions Run Amok, Ink® The Moon Realm®

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Web badges and codes!

New this week: Mr. Phixit and Greydor.

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Cut and paste code below for this 300 x 300 image.

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<a href=”https://themoonrealm.com/2011/08/28/the-moon-coin/”><img src=”https://themoonrealm.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/nimlinn-badge-175.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”175″ height=”175″ /></a>..

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But What Are They Eating?: a blog about food in books. No, not cookbooks—food in FICTION. Everyone talks about what the characters are doing and whom they’re doing it with, yet many forget the most important question: What Are They Eating?

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Carolyn Arcabascio muses on illustrating The Moon Coin:

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Richard Due: Looking through a batch of Carolyn Arcabascio sketches, with the intent of winnowing away chaff, is a trying task namely because: THERE ISN’T ANY CHAFF! Time and again, I would put two final candidates side-by-side on my biggest monitor and stare at them for what felt like hours, waiting for one of them to mess up . . . you know . . . sneeze or something, maybe drop a prop Carolyn had drawn in—ANYTHING to make it easier for me to choose! But no dice! It was one of those times, while staring at the screen for what felt like hours, that the smoky voice of Stones rocker Keith Richards first visited me. It was like he was leaning over my shoulder, staring along with me, only his words were from a Terry Gross interview in which he’d been asked to choose a favorite between two Stones classics:  “I love ’em both, honey. Don’t make me cut the babies in half.”

There are twenty-one pieces of chapter art in The Moon Coin. Let me tell you: I spent a lot of time this summer with Keith Richards’ voice in my head talking about cutting babies in half. And I can’t wait to do it all over again on The Dragondain. But this time I’m going to go for summoning the stern voice of Mary Poppins. I have a hunch she’ll be an excellent decision maker. 😉

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The Moon Coin takes #1 on Listopia‘s

Best Indie Fantasy Worth a Read.

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Click HERE or on the image directly above to be taken to the list (need to be a GoodReads member).

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Danica Page Reviews The Moon Coin

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Digital Book Today Features The Moon Coin

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Underground Book Reviews:  The Moon Coin

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Fiction Book’s First Lines … ‘The Moon Coin’ by Richard Due

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Hopelessly devoted Bibliophile Reviews The Moon Coin and Hosts Guest Post and Giveaway!

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In the Closet with a Bibliophile Reviews The Moon Coin

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Agrippina Legit Reviews The Moon Coin

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SIZZLING READS Review, Interview, and Giveaway.

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Read The Bookscape Report review of The Moon Coin:

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New Author Interview by Blkosiner’s Book Blog

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. . . and I couldn’t have asked for a better one.

Thank you, gathering leaves reviews!

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There are probably as many ways to go about publishing a book as there are ways of writing one. As I conceived the Moon Realm series and wrote the first several books, I envisioned a publishing journey that involved agents and editors and publishers—oh my! But after so many queries and so few offers of representation, I realized I’d have to come to terms with going it alone. But I didn’t want to be alone. So I did what any good, sensible writer would do. I started making things up.

I hadn’t planned it. I didn’t just sit down one day and think, well, what comes next? I didn’t make a list. I didn’t see it coming. I was sitting on my porch on a beautiful day. I’d made a PDF version of the first book to slap onto a Kindle so I could show a friend how it was coming along. But there, at the very bottom of my title page mockup, was a lonely space . . . right where it was supposed to say Scholastic or Bloomsbury or Hyperion Books for Children or Viking. (Ha! Viking! What, am I supposed to believe they actually have Vikings working there? And even if I did believe—I mean, anymore—what about Viking Penguin? Are these Vikings and Penguins working side by side? Or are we talking Viking Penguins? Like the kind you might wake in the middle of the night to find waddling through your coastal village, swinging axes and carrying torches?) I had even once entertained the idea that the bottom of my title page might say—key heavenly music—Candlewick Press. But no. All I had was this big white place of hopelessness, messing up an otherwise perfectly typeset page. Empty. Desolate. Abandoned. Devoid of all meaning.

Actually, the writer in me perked right up. Oooh! A blank space! What am I going to do with that? The story of how L. Frank Baum named OZ rose to mind, but I didn’t need to name a world. I needed to name a press. It had to be dignified, something with both gravitas and chutzpah. Or maybe something hard to pronounce, like Houghton Mifflin, or Knopf. (As unlikely as it may sound, those names were already taken.) And then, in the beat of a butterfly’s wings, it came to me: an idea so obvious one might have imagined it sitting right there in the room, or maybe perching . . . on a three-legged stool.

At the bottom of the title page I typed: Gibbering Gnome Press, a Division of Ingenious Inventions Run Amok, Ink. And just like that, a new indie press was born.

With editing nearly complete, and my press needs met, all I needed now was to find a top-drawer illustrator who LOVED my book. The way I saw it, I had better odds of riding a tornado to Oz than of finding a professional illustrator who loved The Moon Coin. More on that next time. By the way, what ranks above top-drawer?

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The Moon Coin, by Richard Due, is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the iBookstore for $2.99.

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Copyright © 2011 by Richard Due. All rights reserved.

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Gibbering Gnome Press, A Division of Ingenious Inventions Run Amok, Ink®

The Moon Realm®

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February, 2005. I was traveling through that twilight state, from the end of a long day to the beginning of dreams. And I would have made it, too, if not for my older daughter, who kept elbowing me.

“Wake up, Daddy, you’re not making any sense! Finish the story!”

“What story was I telling?”

“Ancient Cat was going into the woods with Little Moo. Little Moo was about to reveal the secret of the long-haired monkeys.”

“Okay, okay.”

A few minutes later, the sting of fresh elbows in my side, “Wake up, Daddy, you’re not making any sense!”

It was from one of these dips into dreamland that I brought back a piece of something, just a story element, really. But it grew.

I stumbled into the living room. My wife took one look at my face and asked me what was wrong. But all I could manage was “notebook.”

Over the next two-and-a-half years—in the early mornings, late at night, and on weekends—the first two books of the Moon Realm series formed like a protogalaxy inside my brain.  I knew that once the drafts were finished, I should set the project aside for a while, but I was chomping at the bit. I didn’t see how I was going to walk away from it for more than six months, tops. Lucky for me, though, I lasted eighteen months! And all I had to do was nearly die! Ha! Didn’t see that coming. More on that later—much later.

In the spring of 2009, I put on my editing cap, which at first felt like a dunce cap, only worse. I couldn’t get the rhythm. Apparently, my mind can conceive of an entire chapter in the space of one nanosecond (the writing it down part takes longer, of course). Editing, however, demanded large blocks of time all to itself. My wife and I own a bookstore. We’re raising two kids. I prefer to write or edit every day. I have to slay dragons just to get medium-sized blocks of time. (I’m not kidding—dragons! Write what you know!)

That summer, we camped in the Shenandoah. I sipped coffee. I watched my kids on the playground. And I outlined books three and four in one go (in micro-type, using a nub of pencil I sharpened with my pocket knife, on a scrap of paper I rooted off the floor of the van). Happy for that bit of inspiration, I shoved the scrap in my pocket and went on editing books one and two.

By the end of January, 2010, having made the rounds with my local writing group and test readers, I thought book one—now dubbed The Moon Coin—was good enough to start showing. So I took it to the SCBWI Winter Conference in New York. The lovely agent and editor I met there didn’t share my enthusiasm. But they gave me some very good ideas; foremost, the book didn’t start fast enough. So in February, I rewrote the first chapter. (I would do this, periodically, for the next ten months, about twenty times in all.) I also started querying literary agencies.

When spring rolled around, I took a break from editing and drafted book three. But I kept up with the querying and conference-going.

That December, nearly six years in, I realized what was wrong with the first chapter: the story didn’t start there. It really started nine years before. I needed a prologue. My first thought was: oh, God, not a prologue! My second thought was: can’t I just call it chapter one?

I was worried. But it felt right, so I wrote the whole thing in one fevered session that went late into the night. After New Year’s, and a lot of editing, I showed the new beginning to my readers. Everyone loved it. So I took it to another SCBWI Winter Conference. This time, the comments I received in the writers intensive were so off the wall as to leave me speechless. In the morning session a fellow writer told me, “If you’re going to write like Fitzgerald, you shouldn’t be writing middle grade.” First off, I don’t write like Fitzgerald. (Of course, I would if I could.) Second, if Fitzgerald had written middle grade, I can’t think of anything I’d want to read more! During the afternoon session, after reading the two pages in which I introduce my main characters as siblings ages four and five, a fellow writer chimed in with: “I love your writing, but I didn’t understand anything other than that the two main characters are obviously married.”

It took me until that evening, over some tapas and a glass of wine with my wife, to realize that only one thing made sense: the prologue was perfect. I’d attended a critique session and duly received “critiques.” But no one could come up with anything that improved the work.

I came home energized and started a second, bigger round of querying. The best thing to come out of that conference, however, was meeting the extraordinary artist who would later agree to be my illustrator. We met at the luncheon. After sharing the projects we’d brought with us and exchanging business cards, I gave her a copy of the prologue and asked her to email me if she liked it. She did, adding she’d love to read more.

I had a request for material around then from someone who was new to agenting, but who’d been a prominent figure in children’s publishing for some time. That stopped everything. Nervous, I reread my first few chapters, expecting them to have suddenly become garbage. They hadn’t, but I did notice that in the prologue I had created a distinct “middle grade” voice I liked very much. The agent had requested the first six chapters, so I rewrote them in the new voice, printed them out, handed them over to my readers, and waited. Everyone thought the chapters improved.

And the agent? She sent me a rejection, but my final line-edit is a little over three-quarters through. That brings me to the present.

Over the last sixteen months, I’ve queried 160 people. I’ve had about a dozen requests for material, two of which are still out, but I’ve stopped holding my breath. Turns out holding one’s breath for stretches longer than sixty days is downright unpleasant. Now begins my newest journey: digital publishing. This blog will detail my experiences bringing the Moon Realm series to a digital reader near you—and what happens after. Here we go, here we go. . . .

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The Moon Coin, by Richard Due, is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the iBookstore for $2.99.

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Copyright © 2011 by Richard Due. All rights reserved.

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Gibbering Gnome Press, A Division of Ingenious Inventions Run Amok, Ink®

The Moon Realm®

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